The Value of Research in Design

8/2/2019 |
2 minutes, 38 seconds Read

Moe Amaya conducted a year long study on the value of design on a blog post reviewing four design projects that he created throughout 2018 and talks a little bit about his expectations, process, time spent, and the success of each one.

Moe Amaya is a well known designer in the design community that I've been following for a while now. His CSS gradient tool is my favorite for creating gradients and it's far better in my opinion than the one that colorzilla created a few years back. It was interesting to find out that he actually does keyword research before starting a project to measure the need for a tool, which translates to more shares and ultimately more backlinks to his tool and website.



However, not all the projects that he made through 2018 relied on a sense of need shown mostly through the number of search queries conducted, like his metatags project, which he designed and developed based on what he thought would be a valuable tool that the community didn't yet know that they needed. I think his metatags project is very valuable, but it's definitely not a tool that I've ever thought of searching for, unlike css gradient tools that do get naturally searched.

Unfortunately, Moe spent the most time on the metatags project, but resulted in the least impact as far as links, mentions, and visits. His most successful project is the css gradient tool, which brings in approximately 30K monthly visits and has been backlinked from many sources.



Cool Backgrounds is a project that was not planned, but did result in approximately 200K searches for "cool backgrounds" and Moe decided to spend some time designing and developing a tool similar to css gradients. He could have just created a website with links to already made "cool backgrounds," but thought that he would get more backlinks and mentions if he spent some time creating an actual tool, which turned out to be true. Although, he did also create a list of sorts for a best gradients list that was also well received called "grabients".



Ultimately, it's always a good idea to research a project and to make sure that there is demand before you set out on creating if your goal is to get people to link and use your tool, especially one that people naturally search.

But design is valuable as long as someone ends up using your product or not, whether that's you or someone else.

Read the original here : Is Design Valuable?